Are you or your spouse a dislocated worker?

Are you or your spouse a dislocated worker?

This is question 100 on the paper Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form.

In general, a person might be considered a dislocated worker if he or she

  • is receiving unemployment benefits due to being laid off or losing a job and is unlikely to return to a previous occupation;
  • has been laid off or received a lay-off notice from a job;
  • was self-employed but is now unemployed due to economic conditions or natural disaster;
  • is the spouse of an active duty member of the U.S. armed forces and has experienced a loss of employment because of relocating due to permanent change in duty station;
  • is the spouse of an active duty member of the U.S. armed forces and is unemployed or underemployed, and is experiencing difficulty in obtaining or upgrading employment; or
  • is a displaced homemaker. A displaced homemaker is generally a person who previously provided unpaid services to the family (for example, a stay-at-home mom or dad), is no longer supported by the spouse, is unemployed or underemployed, and is having trouble finding or upgrading employment.

Except for the spouse of an active duty member of the U.S. armed forces, if a person quits work, generally he or she is not considered a dislocated worker even if, for example, the person is receiving unemployment benefits.

Select “Yes” if you or your spouse is a dislocated worker.

Select “No” if neither you nor your spouse is a dislocated worker.

Select “Don’t know” if you’re not sure whether you or your spouse is a dislocated worker. You can contact the financial aid administrator at your college or career school if you need help answering this question.

Note: If you answer “Yes,” the financial aid administrator at your college or career school might require proof that you or your spouse is a dislocated worker.

Is this answer helpful?

Thank you for your response.
Total Characters: 500 Remaining: 500